The Chainlink

I have a crankset that I'd like to have polished. Does anyone know of a local business that will take on a project like that? I've been searching around, but I'm only finding businesses that take on wholesale projects, not one-offs.

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It's pretty easy to do yourself. I use Mother's Mag & Aluminium Polish on my restorations. Stuff works wonderfully with a terry cloth rag a bit of elbow grease. It's available at most chain auto parts stores.

I'll second Mother's. The only part that I haven't had it work on is some deeply pitted chrome handlebars on my Schwinn Twin.

Michael B said:

It's pretty easy to do yourself. I use Mother's Mag & Aluminium Polish on my restorations. Stuff works wonderfully with a terry cloth rag a bit of elbow grease. It's available at most chain auto parts stores.

Well, these cranks need pretty serious buffing and polishing, but I might try wet sanding with progressively finer grits, and then using something like Mother's. Thanks.

you'll probably need to remove the anodizing first if it's an aluminum crank by using extra strength easy off or aircraft paint remover.

Silicon carbide sand paper is better (than ordinary sand paper) for use on metal if you intend to wet sand.  I use SiC paper to flatten hand plane beds, for example.  It also comes in fine enough grades that I think you should be happy with the result.  You might want to try it on something other than your cranks to see if it will polish up to a sufficient shine. 

Thanks. They're not anodized.

I did these Coda arms last winter.  I sanded the anodizing off, but some folks use oven cleaner.  I just used several grits of sandpaper followed by Turtle wax rubbing compound, but Simichrome is the best stuff I've used on aluminum.

Nice job! It looks great, I think you've convinced me to try it myself.

mark stetson said:

I did these Coda arms last winter.  I sanded the anodizing off, but some folks use oven cleaner.  I just used several grits of sandpaper followed by Turtle wax rubbing compound, but Simichrome is the best stuff I've used on aluminum.

These were the easiest crankarms I've done because they have no deep grooves or valleys, and the spider is seperate from the drive side arm.  It's tedious work, but I did both of these in one night.  The worst thing to deal with is salt corrosion.  Even relatively minor looking pits take a lot of sanding to get out.  This Record crank looks OK in the picture, but after sanding it several times with little progress I gave up on making it really nice.

I've had good luck with polishing aluminum bits using DuPont No. 7 Rubbing Compound, followed up by DuPont Polishing Compound. It takes a long time put can produce a very good shine.

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