The Chainlink

Didn't see a discussion like this.  So what is the etiquette for basement/hallway spaces as well as gate spots?  What have you experienced?  What worked/didn't?  Any casualties?  How should landlords be expected to be responsible for helping with the sharing of indoor spaces or outdoor gate spots?  Best ways to communicate with neighbors/worst ways/other experiences?  I'm so curious what others' experiences are like!

Tags: apartment, etiquette, parking, rental

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I work for a property manager.  We find many tenants abandon bikes and other possessions when they move.  And the abandoned bikes and other junk tends to accumulate in the best, most convenient basement locations. 

So we place a dated sticker on all bikes once a year.  The following year we log bikes that still have the old sticker; two years later we cut their locks and remove them.  We've never had any complaints.  And bike parking spaces remain accessible for the most part. 

If your property manager doesn't have a program to clear basements periodically, why not suggest it?

I just keep my bike inside because I have read too many times about bikes getting stolen from apartments - other tenants either do the same or lock the bikes to the support structures in our basement.

Always best to talk with your neighbors.  If there is a common area in the basement or a garage where bikes will be locked, perhaps assign spaces (and ALWAYS lock the bike TO SOMETHING permanent and unmovable; a bike with its wheels locked to the frame is just a portable piece of metal for the recyclers some thieves sell to). And as per clp above, if the building is big enough, old bikes will be left locked in primo spots.  2 years is waaaaay too long to let such non-used bikes linger, IMHO, but luckily I live someplace where I just bring the bike up the elevator and into my apartment.  Where I lock it to something when I leave it there . . . and you can use the conversation about bikes in shared spaces to get to know your neighbors, always a good thing in any case.

Too many friends have had their bikes stolen from apartment/condo basements. When I was still living in an apartment, I kept my bikes in the dining room.

Amen. But some landlords don't let people bring bikes up in elevators or hallways, or require the use of bike rooms (lots of condos have such rules).

Anne Alt said:

Too many friends have had their bikes stolen from apartment/condo basements. When I was still living in an apartment, I kept my bikes in the dining room.

That's why it's been one of my criteria in searching for a place.  If bikes aren't allowed in the unit, I wouldn't rent or buy there.

Bill Savage said:

Amen. But some landlords don't let people bring bikes up in elevators or hallways, or require the use of bike rooms (lots of condos have such rules).

Anne Alt said:

Too many friends have had their bikes stolen from apartment/condo basements. When I was still living in an apartment, I kept my bikes in the dining room.

I have at least one bike in the dining room at all times, and one locked outside, and 1-2 plus my dog trailer in the basement. I live in a three-flat with two other tenants who have (free) use of the garage, and I have tried (with relative success) to encourage their careful locking of all access doors to the spaces because "my bikes are my car!"

They sometimes forget, and I just send a text - "Door open today at 2 - I locked it - nothing stolen."

We're friendly about it and I am sure it annoys them a bit,  and they will never be as vigilant as I am, so it's not perfect. But I also can't keep it all in my unit, because I have to live in there!

Thanks for sharing!

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