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Geez! You know it all man! That is some top-notch info sir. Thanks!

notoriousDUG said:
PB Blaster is good, but there is some amazing stuff out there geared more commercially; it costs more and you may have to put some effort into getting it but the below items work amazing.

Kroil, this stuff is the gold standard in aviation for a penetrating oil works amazing and is excellent on dissimilar metal corrosion.

Mouse Milk, another aviation favorite works well in my experience.

Loosey Goosey, As dumb as the name is it works quite well.


Heat is amazing at loosening stuck components but not the best on a bike frame IMO, if you have a lugged or fillet brazed frame you have a good chance of weakening the brazing when you heat it up. An aluminum frame is going to not take heat well and it will have a great effect on the hardening and strength of the material, smae goes for Chromemoly or any other heat treated steel.
Any good hardware store or home center should carry it but if it is really, really stuck purchase a commercial grade penetrate, you will not regret it. I use Torq CB from Kimball Midwest and it works amazing but even with that it took near half a can applied over a couple of weeks to remove the seat post from a frame that had been around WTB for some time; patience is the key. Look for penetrates that include acetone on the ingredients list.

Just getting the post out generates an amazing amount of heat... the last two frames I did got so hot they smoked!

buddaa38 said:
Lee were can I find PB Blaster.

Lee Diamond said:
A good penetrating spray is PB Blaster. If it can be undone with a lubricant, that is your baby right there. I like notoriousDUG's technique.

Applying heat might work as well, but I am just too stupif to advise on anything like that, but I will say that seized seatposts are tough. I passed on a $50 80s road Bianchi with a seized seatpost a while back just because it is a bit of a gamble as to whether you can get it out without damaging the frame. You made me nervous for example when you discuss using "a pry bar to open up the frame" which doesn't sound like a good idea.
I had an aluminium post stuck in a steel frame. Pb blast for a week didn't help. Heat and cold (heatgun on the frame, Ice water through the post, Failed.) Finally a sawzall with a long wood blade, cut a side of the post, just a little at a time, finally got it out. The reaction between steel and aluninium (electrolytic) made the post swell up. the fit was so tight, you coudn't get penetrant in the problem area. good luck. AL

notoriousDUG said:
Any good hardware store or home center should carry it but if it is really, really stuck purchase a commercial grade penetrate, you will not regret it. I use Torq CB from Kimball Midwest and it works amazing but even with that it took near half a can applied over a couple of weeks to remove the seat post from a frame that had been around WTB for some time; patience is the key. Look for penetrates that include acetone on the ingredients list.

Just getting the post out generates an amazing amount of heat... the last two frames I did got so hot they smoked!

buddaa38 said:
Lee were can I find PB Blaster.

Lee Diamond said:
A good penetrating spray is PB Blaster. If it can be undone with a lubricant, that is your baby right there. I like notoriousDUG's technique.

Applying heat might work as well, but I am just too stupif to advise on anything like that, but I will say that seized seatposts are tough. I passed on a $50 80s road Bianchi with a seized seatpost a while back just because it is a bit of a gamble as to whether you can get it out without damaging the frame. You made me nervous for example when you discuss using "a pry bar to open up the frame" which doesn't sound like a good idea.
The post does not swell, the corrosion on the outside of it fills the gap to the point it creates pressure locking it into place. This corrosion, fortunately, is porous and a good penetrant can eventually wick it's way into it and soften it to the point that sufficient force can break it free.

Alan Matejka said:
I had an aluminium post stuck in a steel frame. Pb blast for a week didn't help. Heat and cold (heatgun on the frame, Ice water through the post, Failed.) Finally a sawzall with a long wood blade, cut a side of the post, just a little at a time, finally got it out. The reaction between steel and aluninium (electrolytic) made the post swell up. the fit was so tight, you coudn't get penetrant in the problem area. good luck. AL

notoriousDUG said:
Any good hardware store or home center should carry it but if it is really, really stuck purchase a commercial grade penetrate, you will not regret it. I use Torq CB from Kimball Midwest and it works amazing but even with that it took near half a can applied over a couple of weeks to remove the seat post from a frame that had been around WTB for some time; patience is the key. Look for penetrates that include acetone on the ingredients list.

Just getting the post out generates an amazing amount of heat... the last two frames I did got so hot they smoked!

buddaa38 said:
Lee were can I find PB Blaster.

Lee Diamond said:
A good penetrating spray is PB Blaster. If it can be undone with a lubricant, that is your baby right there. I like notoriousDUG's technique.

Applying heat might work as well, but I am just too stupif to advise on anything like that, but I will say that seized seatposts are tough. I passed on a $50 80s road Bianchi with a seized seatpost a while back just because it is a bit of a gamble as to whether you can get it out without damaging the frame. You made me nervous for example when you discuss using "a pry bar to open up the frame" which doesn't sound like a good idea.
I am starting to regret not buying that $50 Bianchi 80's Italian made road frame with the frozen seat tube! Dang!

notoriousDUG said:
The post does not swell, the corrosion on the outside of it fills the gap to the point it creates pressure locking it into place. This corrosion, fortunately, is porous and a good penetrant can eventually wick it's way into it and soften it to the point that sufficient force can break it free.

Alan Matejka said:
I had an aluminium post stuck in a steel frame. Pb blast for a week didn't help. Heat and cold (heatgun on the frame, Ice water through the post, Failed.) Finally a sawzall with a long wood blade, cut a side of the post, just a little at a time, finally got it out. The reaction between steel and aluninium (electrolytic) made the post swell up. the fit was so tight, you coudn't get penetrant in the problem area. good luck. AL

notoriousDUG said:
Any good hardware store or home center should carry it but if it is really, really stuck purchase a commercial grade penetrate, you will not regret it. I use Torq CB from Kimball Midwest and it works amazing but even with that it took near half a can applied over a couple of weeks to remove the seat post from a frame that had been around WTB for some time; patience is the key. Look for penetrates that include acetone on the ingredients list.

Just getting the post out generates an amazing amount of heat... the last two frames I did got so hot they smoked!

buddaa38 said:
Lee were can I find PB Blaster.

Lee Diamond said:
A good penetrating spray is PB Blaster. If it can be undone with a lubricant, that is your baby right there. I like notoriousDUG's technique.

Applying heat might work as well, but I am just too stupif to advise on anything like that, but I will say that seized seatposts are tough. I passed on a $50 80s road Bianchi with a seized seatpost a while back just because it is a bit of a gamble as to whether you can get it out without damaging the frame. You made me nervous for example when you discuss using "a pry bar to open up the frame" which doesn't sound like a good idea.
the corrosion, is the posts structure changing (the white powdery stuff). If it is filling in the gap, It is swelling.
yes the pennetrant will wick through, the time you have to wait will be unknown.
Hi Builders:

I've posted this in the movers group and emailed Alex at Westtown the same situation...

I'm a big guy, 300 lbs and often haul stuff of great weight as well. So as you might imagine I go through more than my fair share of spokes.

My situation is a little unique in that I have a 1994 Schwinn crossbike (bought it new in 94) with index shifting. From what I've been told, I need to keep the (7) Shimano cogs (which requires a free wheel) to have the index shifting work properly. It's a 130mm.

The only tandem hubs I've been able to find that are 130mm, free wheel and 700C has 36 holes. My present rim has 36 holes so it seems of little benefit to go that route if that's the case.

I'm more that willing to give up some of the cogs to get more spokes in return if that's a possibility.

Is there a tandem rear wheel that can be put together that will meet these requirements?

If not, any other ideas on how to strengthen the back wheel?

Thanks!

Paul
Hey everyone. I could use some advice on a bike project.

I'm rebuilding a nice old Raleigh Record Ace for a friend.

He wants upright bars so I thought I'd also replace the stem shifters with some nice gripshifters.

My question: will a SRAM gripshift work with the bike's suntour friction mode rear der? I figure the shifter has so many indexed stops that one of them will match each of his cog positions. I'm replacing the stock Maillard freewheel with a Shimano 6-speed FW.
At the risk of sounding unprofessional, this seems like something you would have to try out to make sure it works correctly. The friction shift derailleurs should work ok with index shifters, but it will ultimately depend on the amount of cable pull the shifter yanks for each shift and how that lines up with your rear cog, but I am guessing you can get it to work with a bit of finessing. How many speeds is the shifter? I am guessing that any modern index shifter is at least a 7-speed.

Barry said:
Hey everyone. I could use some advice on a bike project.

I'm rebuilding a nice old Raleigh Record Ace for a friend.

He wants upright bars so I thought I'd also replace the stem shifters with some nice gripshifters.

My question: will a SRAM gripshift work with the bike's suntour friction mode rear der? I figure the shifter has so many indexed stops that one of them will match each of his cog positions. I'm replacing the stock Maillard freewheel with a Shimano 6-speed FW.
Lee thanks for replying.

I just realized that I misspoke when I mentioned the numerous indexed stops. That's only a feature of the microfriction style shifter for the front derailleur. The rear indexed ones just hit their mark.

6-speed gripshift is still available, so if anybody has gotten that to work with an old Suntour derailleur and Shimano 6-speed freewheel I would love to know about it!

Barry

Lee Diamond said:
At the risk of sounding unprofessional, this seems like something you would have to try out to make sure it works correctly. The friction shift derailleurs should work ok with index shifters, but it will ultimately depend on the amount of cable pull the shifter yanks for each shift and how that lines up with your rear cog, but I am guessing you can get it to work with a bit of finessing. How many speeds is the shifter? I am guessing that any modern index shifter is at least a 7-speed.
Barry said:
Hey everyone. I could use some advice on a bike project.

I'm rebuilding a nice old Raleigh Record Ace for a friend.

He wants upright bars so I thought I'd also replace the stem shifters with some nice gripshifters.

My question: will a SRAM gripshift work with the bike's suntour friction mode rear der? I figure the shifter has so many indexed stops that one of them will match each of his cog positions. I'm replacing the stock Maillard freewheel with a Shimano 6-speed FW.

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