The Chainlink

The colder it gets the harder it is to pedal. Is it me with colder muscles? Colder air in my lungs? Some other physical reason? Or is it mechanical? Cold-thickened oil on the chain? Thicker grease in the hub? Thicker clothes that restrict movement? Enquiring minds want to know.

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I did as well.  I also trimmed down my clothing from sweat pants over tights and a hoodie, to break-away windbreaker pants and a windbreaker jacket.  I am a slightly colder at the start, but once I get going I am hotter than in my older setup.  Probably the fact I seal everything in.

I do notice though, when the wind is blowing at me I almost feel like giving up....I don't know what the cold does but it saps it out of my faster.  I hope it isn't age, I am about to be only 31!!

Gene Tenner said:

Me, me, me.

Lisa Curcio 4.1mi said:

Did anyone notice that with temperatures in the 30s this afternoon/evening it was easier to pedal?

That is a good explanation, thanks for posting.

Tandemonium said:

I feel like it is just windier in the winter as well.  The cold I can handle - the wind is the more challenging. 

These last few days with not too much wind have been so lovely.  And of course it is easy to manage the cold when wearing one of your winter cycling caps! :-)
 
Erin Rensink said:

I feel like it is just windier in the winter as well.  The cold I can handle - the wind is the more challenging. 

It would appear that these numeric values assigned are mere guess-timates lacking a certain degree of scientific rigor.

Mike Schwab said:

  1. Cold Bearings and grease are stiffer and harder to turn: 1%
  2. You need your energy to keep warm: 0%
  3. Your tires are colder and therefore have greater rolling resistance +
  4. You tend to ride softer tires for better control on ice: 3%
  5. Your clothing is bulkier, making it more difficult to push your shape though the air: 5-10%
  6. You are dressed in heavier clothing, making that much more weight to carry: 1%
  7. You are dressed in heavier clothing which resists your movement making pedaling harder: 1%
  8. People simply don't like generating the steam-bath like atmosphere inside of winter clothing, and therefore psychologically resist working as hard as in summer: 1%
  9. Air Density is greater and impedes your progress through the air: 10-20%

Total: 15-30%

I just copied them from the website.

Agreed, that's why it's important to include decimal points and standard deviations. Looks much more authoritative that way:

  1. Cold Bearings and grease are stiffer and harder to turn: 1.658% ±0.2
  2. You need your energy to keep warm: 0%
  3. Your tires are colder and therefore have greater rolling resistance +
  4. You tend to ride softer tires for better control on ice: 3.725% ±0.518
  5. Your clothing is bulkier, making it more difficult to push your shape though the air: 5-10% ±3.874



curt(is) locke said:

It would appear that these numeric values assigned are mere guess-timates lacking a certain degree of scientific rigor.

Mike Schwab said:

  1. Cold Bearings and grease are stiffer and harder to turn: 1%
  2. You need your energy to keep warm: 0%
  3. Your tires are colder and therefore have greater rolling resistance +
  4. You tend to ride softer tires for better control on ice: 3%
  5. Your clothing is bulkier, making it more difficult to push your shape though the air: 5-10%
  6. You are dressed in heavier clothing, making that much more weight to carry: 1%
  7. You are dressed in heavier clothing which resists your movement making pedaling harder: 1%
  8. People simply don't like generating the steam-bath like atmosphere inside of winter clothing, and therefore psychologically resist working as hard as in summer: 1%
  9. Air Density is greater and impedes your progress through the air: 10-20%

Total: 15-30%

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