The Chainlink

Has anyone ever crashed (or know anyone who has) as a result of too much salt on the road?

I'm a journalist (and year-round rider) working on a story. Get in touch if you have a story or know someone who does.

scottklocksin [*at*] gmail or find me on social media and include a short note about why you're contacting me.



THANKS!

Scott

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Seems hard to imagine salt being a direct cause of an accident. There are many greater hazards out there. Can you motivate your request a bit?
Well, it's happened to me, which is where the idea came from. Salt can build up, especially if there's almost no rain to contribute to washing it away all winter. If you have to turn suddenly (especially if you're on any sort of hill, which I realize are scare in Chi but coming off bridges, etc., they do exist) an excess of salt on the road can be a potential hazard for a lot of people who ride year-round. If any such people are out there... I'd love to hear from you. I can't be the only one.

I'd say it can be a bit like gravel when it piles up. Nothing you want to hit too fast or turn too sharply through. There are a few spots along the LFP that are like that right now. I've never fallen on it, but I do take caution when going over them.

But yeah, I'd say clueless tourists are a much greater hazard than the salt they're walking on, on the LFP.

ETA: I just realized you might be thinking of collisions - yeah, I have no idea how salt would cause one of those.


Skip Montanaro 12mi said:

Seems hard to imagine salt being a direct cause of an accident. There are many greater hazards out there. Can you motivate your request a bit?

There is a saying "driving too fast for conditions", and it applies to bikes as well.  If you crashed your car on a dirt road, would you blame the road for being dirt?

Sheesh.  No wonder some people need helmets.

Yeah, I kinda wanted to say, "Not since I took a spill in elementary school."

Nick G said:

There is a saying "driving too fast for conditions", and it applies to bikes as well.  If you crashed your car on a dirt road, would you blame the road for being dirt?

Sheesh.  No wonder some people need helmets.

You're kidding me, right?

Yeah, sure you can wipe out on a pile of loose salt that gathers somewhere but you can also wipe out on some gravel or loose stones and debris that gather as well.  Personally I find the salt piles to provide far better traction than snow and ice.

Sounds to me like maybe you need to slow down and/or stop looking for sensationalized stories.

Scott Klocksin said:

Well, it's happened to me, which is where the idea came from. Salt can build up, especially if there's almost no rain to contribute to washing it away all winter. If you have to turn suddenly (especially if you're on any sort of hill, which I realize are scare in Chi but coming off bridges, etc., they do exist) an excess of salt on the road can be a potential hazard for a lot of people who ride year-round. If any such people are out there... I'd love to hear from you. I can't be the only one.

Well it can surprise you especially if the previous road conditions are "normal". 

The Kinzie lane has a shoveled salt in excess and the same with the recent melt and freeze with piles at the edges of the sidewalks, but usually it just fuses together as a bump.

Potholes and patches of ice are a bigger concern.

I was going my usuall speed along a daily route years ago then on that day they had resealed it and we had a sudden down pour (water and oil mix) and as soon as I hit it my tires went horizontal and I was on the ground.

Nick G said:

There is a saying "driving too fast for conditions", and it applies to bikes as well.  If you crashed your car on a dirt road, would you blame the road for being dirt?

Sheesh.  No wonder some people need helmets.

Every year like clock work I eat shit due to salt.. that shit hurts.

^ Can you get in touch?

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