The Chainlink

When it isn't appropriate to mix in 2 oz of Jack Daniels in your water bottle and you use Nunn hydration electrolyte (salt) tablets, how do you keep your source of hydration from freezing on a winter ride (commute)?

 

On cold days it is a bit of a bummer to have wait an hour or so for enough of my hydration to thaw in order to rehydrate once I get to work.

 

Follow my workouts on http://www.sports-tracker.com/#/dashboard as ChicagoFire using a android Droid phone. Southwestern Naperville area.

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Get a pair of large thermal tube socks, tape chemical hand/foot warmers around the bottle (after activating) and then slip the bottle in both pairs of socks and hope it still fits your cage.
Don't know if this will work for you, but I have an insulated bottle that I put tea or coffee in and let Mother Nature chill down to the iced beverage. So far this winter on rides not using a hot beverage to start with, I have not had my water with nuun freeze inside my bottle. (Longest ride on coldest day this winter 25 miles around 12 f).

Has anyone used camel packs? Would your own body heat keep it from freezing?
Just get it out of the cold air. Store it in your jersey/coat pocket, handlebar bag, seat bag, or pannier and it'll be fine.

This insulated water bottle from Hydroflask is what I have been using recently. My hot tea stays warm forever.

I rode on those -10 windchill days, and my nalgene with the flip top like this: 

http://store.nalgene.com/category-s/25.htm

never froze completely.  I did have to break a hole (really thin layer of ice)  w/ my tooth to get at the water.  Kleen kanteen/reg bottle tops were freezing early in my ride so I went with the wider spout.   The new OTF looks improved with a leakproof cap

Doesnt work for really long rides, because the bottles can freeze completely through...but for shorter rides / commutes I turn my bottles upsidedown so the ice forms at the bottom of the bottle rather than the top, leaving the drinking water available...old backpacking trick.

On the coldest of cold I either leave it empty or keep it in my backpack so my body keeps it warm. 

I can't drink ice cold water anyway.

CamelBak has an entire page of winter products. HERE

I received one of these as a freebie and love it! It's unbreakable stainless (inside and out) and fits in my normal bottle cage:

Thermos vacuum insulated travel mug

 

It keeps my tea hot for several hours even in 15-20 degree weather or lower. Works great in summer for cold stuff too! (Manufacturer says Hot: 5 hours, Cold: 9 hours and I would agree give or take a few)

 

The lid has a pushbutton in the middle to open/close the internal valve. I can operate it even with my huge ski gloves on. In the closed position you can even turn it upside and shake it - doesn't leak!

I use a Camel Bak for skiing or activities where I expect to really develop a thirst.  For Winter Commuting I find the same solution that I use for warmer weather commuting normally works fine- an insulated bottle.  That which keeps it from getting too warm also keeps it from getting too cold. If its so cold that the bottle starts to freeze I am generally not getting all that thirsty.

OMG Brilliant!

Elliot Bennett said:

Doesnt work for really long rides, because the bottles can freeze completely through...but for shorter rides / commutes I turn my bottles upsidedown so the ice forms at the bottom of the bottle rather than the top, leaving the drinking water available...old backpacking trick.

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