The Chainlink

Check out this inexpensive rack that I built using basic materials purchased from my local hardware store. 

It is based on a few designs that I have seen floating around the internets. The benefits of this design are:

  1. Low cost (It was less than $25 for me to build it, I don't mind throwing it away if my apartment management ever finds a spot for our bikes)
  2. No permanent damage was done to our rental. I won't need to patch any large holes from screws, etc.
  3. It can be placed anywhere in a room. It looks as though most gravity bike stands need to be placed along a wall and the windows were the only open spot in my apartment.
  4. I can burn it for heat if necessary.

Here are the plans:

And the finished product:

I used a little bit of felt/rubber padding for the top and bottom pieces. You could also repurpose an old bike tube!

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Nicely done!

Good concept! It could easily be dressed up for a few more bucks too!

Nice Solution! 

Reminds me of an Ikea solution I have from an old tv stand. Not sure if it would hold on pressure alone though. http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20179940/

Thanks! I was inspired by a couple of Ikea post ideas that I had seen on the interweb. I just wasn't sure what I would do with two IKEA posts if I found alternative storage. I may end up painting/finishing it if it turns into a long-term storage piece. 

I'd be wary if all the support is coming from the tension on the bolt on the bottom. You need a back-up/fail-safe of some sort. If there's a mm or two of warpage in the drywall or floor over time, the whole thing will come crashing down. I'd at least drill a bracket into the ceiling or something...

Nice.  But loose bikes are like candy to a baby: just for peace of mind, I'd like to see some kind of LOCK, to prevent a casual visitor from merely lifting a bike off the rack, down the stairs and away.  Perhaps a length of iron pipe between the uprights from which a U-lock could attach to the bike frame.  Just enough to slow down a thief...or make the pizza delivery boy think twice about coming back.

That's a pretty good point, I also forgot to point out that I tried to place the "feet" of my posts over studs. I'm in a high-rise which I'm guessing is constructed of steel and concrete, so I assumed there should be minimal building warpage occurring (about 9E-2 in. of thermal expansion?). I was thinking that perhaps a heavy duty spring to provide tension as opposed to the carriage bolt and tee nut could solve any problems of warpage.

Kelvin Mulcky said:

I'd be wary if all the support is coming from the tension on the bolt on the bottom. You need a back-up/fail-safe of some sort. If there's a mm or two of warpage in the drywall or floor over time, the whole thing will come crashing down. I'd at least drill a bracket into the ceiling or something...

I'm new to Chicago, but is crime so bad that I have to lock down items in my locked apartment? I hope not  :)

clp said:

Nice.  But loose bikes are like candy to a baby: just for peace of mind, I'd like to see some kind of LOCK, to prevent a casual visitor from merely lifting a bike off the rack, down the stairs and away.  Perhaps a length of iron pipe between the uprights from which a U-lock could attach to the bike frame.  Just enough to slow down a thief...or make the pizza delivery boy think twice about coming back.

Not usually.  Perhaps I'm paranoid.  But last summer I left my bike unlocked on my back porch and walked 5 steps away.  A crook walking down the alley saw the unlocked bike, stepped through the back yard, and grabbed the bike in front of me.  I turned, shouted, and ran for my disappearing bike.  He was still one step ahead of me when he hit the alley, swung one leg over the seat, and accelerated away.

I never leave bikes unlocked in the City now...would you leave a couple $100 bills hanging loose for all to see and attempt to grab? 

Cool rack, and nice bikes! The bottom one looks like a Salsa Fargo, what's on top?

Thanks! The Fargo belongs to my girlfriend and the bike on top is my Cross-Check. I had it powder coated a few months ago to a nearly safety reflective chartreuse. 
Timothy Delmar Sweetser said:

Cool rack, and nice bikes! The bottom one looks like a Salsa Fargo, what's on top?

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