The Chainlink

I've been riding around with simple, knitted gloves, and on days like today when it's wet/raining, well, yikes!

I've never been into the idea of biking gloves - I'm cheap? - but obviously I need some sort of waterproof glove. Be it a thin waterproof layer than I can put over my other gloves, or thicker/warmer for when the cold kicks in, I'll take either. Both! All I know is that I need gloves that aren't my snowboarding gloves because I need flexibility, but again, something that are waterproof/weatherproof!

Anyone have any suggestions?

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Yeah; Why don't you come check out Bike- Winter workshop Friday13th. We will talk all about this stuff. Just watch the calendar for time place.
$12 Neoprene Glacier Gloves from Sierra Trading post.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/,1455W_Glacier-Glove-801BK-Split...

They're 3mm neoprene that is fleece-lined for easy on-off and comfort. They also have thumb and index finger slits. Same idea as those wool fingerless gloves with floppy velcro-back mitten hoods.

This is my first winter biking and I haven't tried them yet. But I've been a mariner in the wet and cold for years. No matter how waterproof the glove, your wet hands will always soak them once you take them on and off. So I gave up on dry hands and settle for warm damp hands. Unlike other hot-when-wet materials like fleece and wool, neoprene doesn't soak up water and have a spongy feel.

Take it with a grain of salt though since this is my sailing solution and I haven't biked a winter. In a couple of weeks I'll get back to you with the results.

I love my Lake gloves. they have a long gauntlet portion so there are no gaps between the jacket and glove. they also have removable liners so you can adjust them for different temperatures and they have a zipper pocket so you can put those warmers in them for the really cold. good water-proofness, but they will soak through in a really bad downpour, but I've never had problems or complaints with them.
I find it works to have a cheap under layer glove. something to keep you warm-ish, and leather gloves of some sort. personally anything accept those super super thin fake leather gloves. and ontop of those wool mittens you can buy someplace, make via crochet or knit or sew some up from a sweater.

mittens are known though for keeping your hands warmer thing finger gloves. mix and match till something works out

I used wool socks a few times :-D
Well, they cost a lot, but the pearl izumi lobster gloves are warm water proof, wind proof and give you mobility. I rode with them last winter and highly recommend them.

http://www.pearlizumi.com/product.php?mode=view&pc_id=50&pr...
I have a pair of mountain hardwear gloves that have lasted me 5+ years. They're not waterproof, but when it's cold enough to snow, gloves don't really get all that wet. The most important thing is to get a pair of gloves that have something in them to stop the wind because that's what will really suck the heat from your fingers, and why your current pair of knit gloves won't do much to keep your hands warm. Gore windstopper material is what's in these gloves and they're good for my until it gets below 15 or so. Then I switch over to my ski gloves which are totally non-dexterous and bulky as crap but keep my fingers from falling off.

I haven't ever had lobster gloves, but everyone I know that has them loves them.
Those glacier gloves look awesome, but i use performance brand windstopper gloves. I use a liner with them for days like today. Lobsters are on my list tho...
I found that Scuba Diving gloves are fairly effective at blocking wind/water and keeping your hands toasty. The thicker the neoprene, the more warmth. The trade off is that they don't breathe as well and are a bit difficult to layer. However, since my snowboard gloves were also not cutting it, I found that these are a good subsitute and I didn't have to buy anything new. When it gets really cold I'm gonna try and wear the Scuba gloves under the snowboarding gloves and see how much dexterity I have.


EvanDynamic said:
$12 Neoprene Glacier Gloves from Sierra Trading post.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/,1455W_Glacier-Glove-801BK-Split...

They're 3mm neoprene that is fleece-lined for easy on-off and comfort. They also have thumb and index finger slits. Same idea as those wool fingerless gloves with floppy velcro-back mitten hoods.

This is my first winter biking and I haven't tried them yet. But I've been a mariner in the wet and cold for years. No matter how waterproof the glove, your wet hands will always soak them once you take them on and off. So I gave up on dry hands and settle for warm damp hands. Unlike other hot-when-wet materials like fleece and wool, neoprene doesn't soak up water and have a spongy feel.

Take it with a grain of salt though since this is my sailing solution and I haven't biked a winter. In a couple of weeks I'll get back to you with the results.

Evan, if you survived last winter I'd be interested in an update on how those gloves worked for you.


I just bought a pair of these two nights ago:
http://www.rei.com/product/803638
And really like them so far. The user comments suggest they're completely waterproof. Haven't tried them in bitter cold yet but I'll be surprised if they're enough without some sort of thin liner layer underneath.

I've been riding the last month or so with Outdoor Research Meteor Mitts:

http://www.outdoorresearch.com/site/meteor_mitts_mil.html

 

The best test so far has been a 45-minute commute in mean temperature of 5 degrees with a below-zero windchill. The outer mitts alone kept my hands toasty warm. If you add the liners, I'm not sure you'll ever get cold. The mitts have a big cuff to go over the sleeves of your jacket which eliminates any cold air sneaking in and freezing your wrists or forearms. The liners are convertible so the tips of the fingers/thumbs pull back easily so you can use your fingers on your phone or in your pocket, or whatever, w/o taking off the liners. Really I can't say enough good things about these. They work great for bike commuting.

These $40 gloves are super-warm and waterproof (Hipera inter-layer) and are made for motorcycle use.  They are probably a lot warmer than needed on a bicycle unless it is zero degrees or below depending on how easily your hands get cold.  Your hands definately will not get cold in them.  Too hot maybe -but never too cold.  The build quality is awesome for the price.  Very good stitching and decent materials are used.  Not nearly as bulky as a similar non-riding glove with equivalent warmth.

 

 

under armour extreme coldgear gloves. i wore these all last winter, and this far into this one. they aren't 100 percent waterproof but i only had to double up my gloves once or twice last winter. mine are about worn out and i am buying another pair.

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