The Chainlink

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I get sad every time I see a bike locked to the rack under the Metra tracks at 19th and Western, because I know it's probably going to be there every time I pass for the next few months, missing more parts each time.

It actually doesn't make me sad, because people are putting those abandoned parts to use. It's being recycled!

There's an abandoned bike I see regularly which has some parts I'd really like to use but it frustrates me I can't get ahold of the owner.  

It evokes a feeling of abandonement, but afterwards mostly anger at the previous owner that uses a public space to store thier immobile scraps.

Problem there is how do you know if it is abandoned or just left there for a long time?

Taking parts of a bike that is not yours is stealing.

Garth Liebhaber said:

It actually doesn't make me sad, because people are putting those abandoned parts to use. It's being recycled!

There's an abandoned bike I see regularly which has some parts I'd really like to use but it frustrates me I can't get ahold of the owner.  

I often wonder about the owners of the disintegrating bikes that are locked to various objects in my neighborhood. Did they die? Wind up in jail unexpectedly? Trade up? Sometimes I watch people swing by the bikes on the city bike rack across the street and take parts off in the middle of the night. Calling 311 does not help.

Only to be picked at by thieving bicycle vultures.

Juan said:

It evokes a feeling of abandonement, but afterwards mostly anger at the previous owner that uses a public space to store thier immobile scraps.

Who's to say it was abandoned before the fork was stolen?  Once the bike is immobile I can see why it's abandoned.

But jeez... who steals a 19" schwinn varsity fork?

I guess it's why bikes are supposed to be registered, so owners can be located?

Meth...Not even once.

Juan Primo said:

Who's to say it was abandoned before the fork was stolen?  Once the bike is immobile I can see why it's abandoned.

But jeez... who steals a 19" schwinn varsity fork?

so, ethical dilemna question: how long should a bicycle be abandoned before it's okay to recycle it?  At some point the original owner clearly has no interest in it.

The police have stickers they put on bicycles they believe to be abandoned, giving the owner a week to claim it before it goes to auction. This is all around ethical. If the owner has registered, the police have an even better chance of maintaining ownership.

Consider also that at some point an abandoned bicycle becomes an eyesore and is also taking up space where someone else could be locking their bicycle. Ethically, it is in the place of the police to sell abandoned bicycles at public auction. 

Part of the dilemna comes into being when the police are lax in this duty and others see opportunity. If a bicycle has been abandoned for three years and is beginning to rust, isn't it safe to say the owner doesn't care about it anymore?

maybe get your own bike parts, rather than resort to mental masterbation to rationalize taking something thats not rightfully yours. If I need a fork or a saddle, I'll buy/trade for one myself instead of sneaking around taking parts off bikes and convincing myself it's ok.

Metal recyclers.  Every ounce counts.  What I want to know: how do you NOT lock your f^*&ing fork to the rack too?

Juan Primo said:

Who's to say it was abandoned before the fork was stolen?  Once the bike is immobile I can see why it's abandoned.

But jeez... who steals a 19" schwinn varsity fork?

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