The Chainlink

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You weren't kidding. I just can't imagine it all would actually work.

I like the bike share idea. The fact that it will make you check in after a crash seems a little much
That should be something you turn on only in the country. After a crash it it could scream out , witnesses give us your contact info or take a 30 sec video that would work in the city.

$250 bucks? No way. 

It doesn't solve the actual problem with current locks - they can all be cut off with conventional angle cutters. I'd rather see that money sunk into materials research to develop lightweight, stronger metals that are more impervious to real problems. 

what about this instead?

http://gizmodo.com/this-lock-disables-steering-so-your-bike-cant-be...

now add some geo-fence technology to that? plus a lock, of course...and that cat that comes out of nowhere and attacks the would-be thief...

I am always leery of reviews that in the first paragraph point out that a lock "looks amazing". Really? since when is that a quality required in a lock?

I'm leery of any design which feels the need to incorporate smartphone technology to make a better lock. After all, keys are so Analog!

Duppie said:

I am always leery of reviews that in the first paragraph point out that a lock "looks amazing". Really? since when is that a quality required in a lock?

Steering locks went through a brief period of popularity in Europe in the 70s and 80s. The main problem was that it required a non standard forkand headset.

If this could be used on a standard fork and headset, it may have a future as a secondary lock, much like a rear wheel lock you see on Dutch bikes.

Anne said:

what about this instead?

http://gizmodo.com/this-lock-disables-steering-so-your-bike-cant-be...

now add some geo-fence technology to that? plus a lock, of course...and that cat that comes out of nowhere and attacks the would-be thief...

Problem is there IS NO MATERIAL that is not easily cut with an angle grinder and the proper wheel.  Titanium, Inconel, and other super alloys still cut fairly easy with an abrasive disc.

rwein5 said:

$250 bucks? No way. 

It doesn't solve the actual problem with current locks - they can all be cut off with conventional angle cutters. I'd rather see that money sunk into materials research to develop lightweight, stronger metals that are more impervious to real problems. 

We'll need to travel to another planet then to find something. 

notoriousDUG said:

Problem is there IS NO MATERIAL that is not easily cut with an angle grinder and the proper wheel.  Titanium, Inconel, and other super alloys still cut fairly easy with an abrasive disc.

rwein5 said:

$250 bucks? No way. 

It doesn't solve the actual problem with current locks - they can all be cut off with conventional angle cutters. I'd rather see that money sunk into materials research to develop lightweight, stronger metals that are more impervious to real problems. 

Yup -  I agree that IS the problem. That's why I want to see more R&D into materials science and not "smart locks".

notoriousDUG said:

Problem is there IS NO MATERIAL that is not easily cut with an angle grinder and the proper wheel.  Titanium, Inconel, and other super alloys still cut fairly easy with an abrasive disc.

rwein5 said:

$250 bucks? No way. 

It doesn't solve the actual problem with current locks - they can all be cut off with conventional angle cutters. I'd rather see that money sunk into materials research to develop lightweight, stronger metals that are more impervious to real problems. 

I'm afraid thieves would steal the bike and the lock.  

Maybe we should concentrate on making better people.  Then we wouldn't have to worry about locks.

Julie Hochstadter said:

We'll need to travel to another planet then to find something. 

notoriousDUG said:

Problem is there IS NO MATERIAL that is not easily cut with an angle grinder and the proper wheel.  Titanium, Inconel, and other super alloys still cut fairly easy with an abrasive disc.

rwein5 said:

$250 bucks? No way. 

It doesn't solve the actual problem with current locks - they can all be cut off with conventional angle cutters. I'd rather see that money sunk into materials research to develop lightweight, stronger metals that are more impervious to real problems. 

This made me laugh.

Duppie said:

I am always leery of reviews that in the first paragraph point out that a lock "looks amazing". Really? since when is that a quality required in a lock?

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