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Local 15 year Chicago Biker announces new ebook on Kindle.


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BIKE 365-Tricks and Tips for The Urban Cyclist Riding through all the Seasons, including A Chicago-Style Winter!
 
 

BIKE 365-Tricks and Tips for The Urban Cyclist Riding through all the Seasons, including A Chicago-Style Winter! [Kindle Edition]

Dan Becco 

Digital List Price: $9.99 What's this? 
Kindle Purchase Price: $9.99
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Book Description

 October 19, 2012
365 is the number of days you can ride your bike in Chicago or any other city. This book covers all of the important things your 4th grade teachers left out about using a bike through all four seasons including warm, cold, hot, windy, snowy, sunny and rainy weather. Explore how to find the right bike, how to take care of it, and “the art of gear” for winter riding. Ride away with tips on how to ride safely and efficiently, including how to carry groceries and other items.
Taught by Dan Becco 773-784-6542
He has been biking 365.25 days a year for 14 years in Chicago... and counting. Throughout this time, he has learned valuable tips and tricks, purchased countless useful (and useless) gear, and has assembled a bible’s worth of knowledge for eager cyclists. Go to www.danbecco.com/classes for previous testimonials from past students.

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Congrats on the book Dan!

Do you need any faux-controversey to spur sales?

We're pretty good at that.

Dan, Congratulations.

In recognition of h's suggestion...

- Wool or synthetic?

- Fat tires, skinny tires, or studded?

 

Thanks Justin!

definitely wool combined with synthetic.

Skinny tires.

like Bike 365 on facebook for more tips

see you on the other side, bro.



Justin B Newman said:

Dan, Congratulations.

In recognition of h's suggestion...

- Wool or synthetic?

- Fat tires, skinny tires, or studded?

 

Thanks!

I'm not sure about "faux-controversey," but I'm open to ideas.

Thanks for your reply h'



h' said:

Congrats on the book Dan!

Do you need any faux-controversey to spur sales?

We're pretty good at that.

Mr. Bike's book is a good one, too!

Crafty Cycling Chick said:

Mr. Bike's 1997 edition of Urban Bikers' Tricks and Tips: Low-Tech and No-Tech Ways to Find, Ride, and Keep a Bicycle is going for $4,999.00 at amazon. (Other editions and more reasonable pricing also available.) I guess all bike-related books have to involve the words "tricks and tips" just like all of Tristan Taormino's crap has to involve the word "ultimate"... :P

coming soon:  "The Ultimate Guide to Proper (Bicycle) Lubrication for Women"

Crafty Cycling Chick said:

I guess all bike-related books have to involve the words "tricks and tips" just like all of Tristan Taormino's crap has to involve the word "ultimate"... :P

I picked up an edition of this for a buck on Amazon recently after seeing it referenced by Andrew Bedno somewhere.  Evidently I got a real deal!

There's some "tricks and tips" that are a bit outdated and even a few ideas that had me practically recoiling in horror, but in a lot of ways I think it's the most sensibly designed book I've seen about urban riding.

Many practical, real-life "what-ifs?" are given some thought and it's an incredibly graphic book, overflowing with charts, diagrams and various illustrations.

Personally, I think if Dave Glowacz, BikesnobNYC and Grant Peterson collaborated on a book, it might come the closest to being a city biking "Bible."

Dan, I just bought your book and am looking forward to reading it.


dan becco said:

Mr. Bike's book is a good one, too!

Crafty Cycling Chick said:

Thanks Andrew for the support!

Let me know if you have any further questions.

I'd be happy to elaborate.

Bike on.

dan

Do you recall any offhand? Would be good fodder for some fruitful discussion, perhaps.

Andrew N said:

There's some "tricks and tips" that are a bit outdated and even a few ideas that had me practically recoiling in horror, but in a lot of ways I think it's the most sensibly designed book I've seen about urban riding.

I'm failing to recall many specifics, but definitely remember being a little surprised at DG's advocacy of swinging a lock at a car in response to a driver's aggressive behavior (I'm blanking on specific circumstance put forward in this example).  I'm hesitant to try to be too specific without referring to the book; I'll do that later this evening and report back then or tomorrow.

And while I may have recoiled in horror, I also remember thinking that in regard to that and some of the other things in the book that jumped out at me likely had to do with changed circumstances/attitudes over the past ~15 years as well as the fact that the # of transportation-minded cyclists is significantly larger then when the book was written/revised.

h' said:

Do you recall any offhand? Would be good fodder for some fruitful discussion, perhaps.


Interesting, thanks.

I also remember my mind's eyebrows raising a bit at the suggestion of U-lock justice in a 'real' book.

I use to say "I love you" to drivers, but if it had a tone of sarcasm it wasn't too good.  Now I gesture with the "call me" hand sign. It is probably confusing to drivers but at least they do not get angry and just sit there and think, perhaps, what is with that? which I think is fine. Making a driver think is good.

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