The Chainlink

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Does Active Trans or anyone else have any hard numbers on where CDOT's budget comes from? I think that it would be interesting to see the break down of how much use fees, federal grants, and local general taxes cover. I did a little digging last night, but I wasn't able to find much. My hunch based on how little the use fees paid to the city are, is that the majority of CDOT's budget comes from general local taxes that we all pay, but I'd be interested to see how big of majority that is.



Active Transportation Alliance said: 

We are Chicago’s children, sisters and grandmothers. We live on the north side, west side and south side. We are black, white and Hispanic. We speak English, Spanish and Polish. We are going to the grocery store, dropping by the park and visiting family. We are going to work as your teachers, your waiters and your IT professionals. We are poor, we are wealthy, we are middle class. We are also drivers. We pay gas taxes, sales taxes and property taxes that pay for roads. We write today because we share one thing in common: we ride bikes because it’s healthy, affordable and convenient – and we want “complete streets” in our neighborhoods that safely accommodate everyone – people on foot, in cars, and, yes, on bikes. 

I may be in the minority, but I do feel that as a bicycle rider using public streets that are financed by gasoline taxes, vehicle registration fees, and general property taxes, there is a need to pay at least a portion of the cost, especially for marking of bike lanes, dedicated lane construction, etc.  There's no free lunch and I'm getting tired of automobile owners telling me I don't pay my own way.  I'd be happy to pay $25/year for a registration that includes a barcoded number on a "non-removable" tag that could be used to locate bikes reported as stolen.

A big problem with most taxes and license fees is that they go into the general fund, so any ordnance has to be well written.

That has been tried on a massive scale in the 80's in the Netherlands. And it simply doesn't work. Visibly coding bikes did do nothing to deter bike theft, nor did it do anything to increase recovery rates.

The effort was abandoned after only a few years.


Jeff B said:

I'd be happy to pay $25/year for a registration that includes a barcoded number on a "non-removable" tag that could be used to locate bikes reported as stolen.

As a home-owner who chooses to commute to work by bike in spite of the number of cars I own and drive, I feel I am contributing at least my fair share to the maintenance of the roads.

Of course, what do you expect out of someone who grew up under the appellation of John (or Jack) Kass?

Kass is a total ass.  Property taxes pay for the majority of city streets (not highways).  City parking stickers arguably fund street parking.  So, since bike owners pay property taxes by virtue of simply living in the city, bike accommodations on streets are simply another city service that contributes to the efficiency and safety of the city's transportation system.  No additional fees or other regulations are required.  We all pay (and contribute more over to the health, vibrancy and economy of the city....and relieve parking stresses as well for the suburban drivers who pay $0 property taxes to chicago.

The bike registration has been tried and the cost of administration far exceed any benefits..typically.



Jeff B said:

I may be in the minority, but I do feel that as a bicycle rider using public streets that are financed by gasoline taxes, vehicle registration fees, and general property taxes, there is a need to pay at least a portion of the cost, especially for marking of bike lanes, dedicated lane construction, etc.  There's no free lunch and I'm getting tired of automobile owners telling me I don't pay my own way.  I'd be happy to pay $25/year for a registration that includes a barcoded number on a "non-removable" tag that could be used to locate bikes reported as stolen.

A big problem with most taxes and license fees is that they go into the general fund, so any ordnance has to be well written.

While I agree that no one should get a free ride, in this case cyclists really aren't getting a free ride. Gasoline taxes and vehicle registrations do very little to fund city streets. Gasoline taxes are a mix state and federal taxes, and vehicle registrations are a state fee. While some of this money makes it back to cities in the form of grants, the majority is used to fund highway construction. City streets are primarily funded by local property and sales taxes, with some offset from the state and federal grants mentioned above, and in Chicago, city sticker sales. Cyclists pay property and sales taxes at the same rate as everyone else. Therefore they are paying into the system nearly as much as drivers and demanding far less from it. If anyone is getting a free ride, it's suburban commuters like Kass who drive on Chicago city streets, but don't pay Chicago property taxes.



Jeff B said:

I may be in the minority, but I do feel that as a bicycle rider using public streets that are financed by gasoline taxes, vehicle registration fees, and general property taxes, there is a need to pay at least a portion of the cost, especially for marking of bike lanes, dedicated lane construction, etc.  There's no free lunch and I'm getting tired of automobile owners telling me I don't pay my own way.  I'd be happy to pay $25/year for a registration that includes a barcoded number on a "non-removable" tag that could be used to locate bikes reported as stolen.

A big problem with most taxes and license fees is that they go into the general fund, so any ordnance has to be well written.

Bicycle infrastructure costs 1/100 of what car infrastructure does. Cyclists contribute money that goes to road and bridge construction through state, property and federal taxes, and cause virtually no wear on the road.  So in effect, I pay for highways I almost never drive on, streets that I'm only entitled to using 3 feet of, and my vehicle causes virtually no damage to them. 

Hey! Kass made Bike Snob's Friday Fun Quiz!

4) When not calling for a tax on cycling, John Kass is sodomizing chickens with beer cans.

ok so who is this guys agent? you know the one who keeps posting about this piece of work

Well, it would help repay the $800 or so I saved by not getting a city sticker for my car for a number of years.  I can't believe registration data wasn't used to mail city sticker notices until recently.

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