The Chainlink

I've been thinking recently of building up a fast city bike tailored to those nasty, mucky, snow-filled days we're so familiar with from the winter, and now I'm looking for frame suggestions.

Here's what I'm looking for:

1. Preferably cro-mo steel (but aluminum seems reasonable too.) Definitely no carbon.
2. Something leaning a little more toward road than mountain geometry. Cyclocross?
3. Fits oversized 700c tires.
4. Fits fenders (and preferably has mounts for them.)
5. No brake mounts required (but definitely no canti posts.)  I'm going disc/drum.
6. Any or no fork is fine.  I'll probably pick one up specifically for disc.

I think I'd be willing to spend up to $700, but would prefer something around $350.

Any thoughts on what fits the bill?  Anything I'm missing?

I've been looking at the Civia Hyland for starters.  What else ya got?

Tags: bike, frame, transportation

Views: 108

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Might want to look at the Soma Double Cross DC—runs $350-$400 without a fork, and has room for 38s with fenders, disc mounts, and removable cantilever bosses. I haven't taken one for a spin but I've heard nothing but good things about them and have had my eye on the Double Cross without disc mounts for my next bike.
Salsa used to make the La Cruz which had disc mounts. You can probably find an older model frame on eBay (hopefully)

Otherwise, Salsa also makes the Vaya which has disc mounts.
Alright, it's not the right sized wheels per your specs, but check this out:
http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/bik/1654676462.html
Thanks for the suggestions. Keep 'em coming.

Kevin, that's a nice find, but it's a bit clunkier than what I'm looking for. Dr. D, I'd looked at Soma too, and was hopeful I'd find something there, but the Double Cross has too many extra brake fittings than I'd like (although I like that fork and wouldn't mind getting my hands on a loose one.)

W's beard, Salsa hadn't occurred to me. I looked at the Vaya on their site and it occurred to me I neglected one spec - I'm planning an internally geared hub, so I need adjustable dropouts, but the Casseroll Single might be just the ticket. If I could change anything about the frame, I'd lose the derailleur hanger, but it's the leading contender right now.
Why do you need adjustable dropouts for an internal geared hub?

If you have the proper chain length, you just set the length and the hub, lock the hub down and ride.

Seems to me the perceived necessity of adjustable dropouts complicates an otherwise easily achievable goal.
Weir's beard said:
Why do you need adjustable dropouts for an internal geared hub?

I guess I've always felt vertical dropouts wouldn't give me enough control at dialing in the chain tension, so I've been on the lookout for horizontal dropouts. Would you say today's hubs don't need that kind of adjustment? (Or is there some other built in adjustment?) If so, it would definitely open up my search more.
When you said adjustable dropouts, I thought you meant paragron dropouts.

Horizontal dropouts will do the trick, provided the Vaya has those, it should meet your recommendations.

If you're going for the Casseroll, I'd just as soon recommend the Surly Cross Check, but again, the issue is disc mounts. Not too many bikes out there with horizontal drops and disc mounts.

You can also use a chain tensioner like the Surly Singleator to adjust tension on a vertical dropout frame.



mindfrieze said:
Weir's beard said:
Why do you need adjustable dropouts for an internal geared hub?

I guess I've always felt vertical dropouts wouldn't give me enough control at dialing in the chain tension, so I've been on the lookout for horizontal dropouts. Would you say today's hubs don't need that kind of adjustment? (Or is there some other built in adjustment?) If so, it would definitely open up my search more.
Take a peek at the Surly stable. You find find something good there.
It's way over your price range but it fits your specs exactly.
www.co-motion.com/single_bikes/amerohloff.html
Made in America frame that would probably last the rest of your life if taken care of.

Of course you could probably buy a Cross Check frame, have disc tabs added, canti studs cut and a new powder coat for under $1000.
I'd agree that the Co-Motion is a truly beautiful bike, but for less than 1/3 of the price of that Co-Motion you can get the same idea from Civia. It's called the Bryant: Cro-Moly frame, road geometry, fits oversized tires, fenders and a rack, comes with Disc brakes, IGH, fork and, like the Co-Motion, a carbon belt. A complete bike for $1680 MSRP (or in SS version for $1260)

(I do know this is also well above your budget, but one can always dream....)

JKH said:
It's way over your price range but it fits your specs exactly.
www.co-motion.com/single_bikes/amerohloff.html Made in America frame that would probably last the rest of your life if taken care of. Of course you could probably buy a Cross Check frame, have disc tabs added, canti studs cut and a new powder coat for under $1000.
mindfrieze said:
I'm planning an internally geared hub, so I need [horizontal] dropouts

The Co-Motion that JKH mentions is a bike that runs a IGH with vertical dropouts. It's achieved by using and eccentric bottom bracket, most commonly used in tandems

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2008-2014   The Chainlink Community, L.L.C. Julie Hochstadter, Director   Powered by

Disclaimer  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service