The Chainlink

It was fun, not really, to discover this morning that my bike lock was removed from the bike rack in front of the building where I work (Clark & Jackson).

I have been storing my lock on the rack for the past three years without a problem.   There have been other locks stored on the rack.   All of the locks were removed when I went to lock my bike today.

I asked someone in the building and they said that the city would have removed the locks.  Is this a practice by the city?   Is their a rule against keeping locks on the bike racks?

This is the firts that I cave come across this.

Thanks.

 

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DIBS on that Donut !!!

Bring your own angle grinder!

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I have noticed periodic removal of bike locks left on racks. I wouldn't be surprised if this was one of those waves of removals.

Some racks get REALLY cluttered up with locks. It's always a risk to leave something in one place for an extended period of time.

I don't have a problem with leaving locks on racks, but I've never really understood it. Is it that much of a hassle to take your lock with you? Don't you ever make unexpected stops on your way to or from work?

And for the record, I despise dibs, but the analogy doesn't hold up here.

I'll leave the second lock on the rack so I don't have to carry both. It is a bit of a hassle to carry 2 ulocks as well as a cable lock with all the rest of the crap that I'm usually transporting. I'll risk losing a lock over my bike any day. I've never, ever encountered a rack or a pole that was so cluttered with locks that I couldn't access it. Let's file this under a yet another non-problem cyclists whine about.

Wait.

"It is a bit of a hassle to carry 2 ulocks as well as a cable lock with all the rest of the crap..."

Who is whining?

Seriously go fuck yourself.

\'!'/

LOL..thanks!

I'm not the one casting insults and profanity!

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