The Chainlink

I'm kind of a blank slate in this regard . . .

I went to the eye doctor for the first time ever yesterday for an exam . . . I thought the exam was great but then everything was crazy-rushed and I didn't have time to explore the options.

Anyways, I'm the only one in my family who never had glasses, but it seems I'm having normal age-related changes.  I'm getting more far-sighted . . . having the most trouble reading small print especially in low light . . .

The doc said I could get by with standard reading glasses for the small print situations, and said I have a very slight prescription for far.

So I can get one pair of glasses covered mostly by insurance. They can be bifocals (near/nml, near/far, far/nml) or regular . . . things like trifocals or progressives come with a significant upcharge.

How do you folks who wear glasses while riding handle it? Do you just wear your regular everyday glasses? Have you got prescription riding glasses of some sort?

 

I'm probably not even asking the right questions so any clarifying questions appreciated.

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You just get your prescription from the eye doc and go to the optical shop of your choice.  Pick a frame for the sunglasses, then say it's for sunglasses.  They'll show you a whole bunch of different tints, and you pick which tint the lenses will be. 

 

Or you can do it online, but then you don't get to try on the frame for comfort and fit before spending $$, unless you go to a shop that carries what you're looking for and try it there first.

h' said:

Sounds like a possibility.  How do I go about that? Will the eye doc carry those (prescription sunglasses) or do I track them down myself and have the doc do the lenses?

Moc Artsy said:
I'd recommend getting a pair of prescription sunglasses along with your general pair. I generally wear mine on rides.

I had Transitions lenses on a previous pair of glasses.  They're a mixed bag, but mostly good.  There's a little bit of a break-in period when they're new.  They don't change quite as quickly during the break-in period.  (To speed up break-in period, put them on a sunny windowsill for a while when you're indoors if you won't get outside much during the weekday.)  Once they're broken in, they adjust fairly quickly.

Pros:  Having regular glasses and sunglasses without having to change glasses.  Lenses adjust in changing light conditions, so if you go under a long viaduct while riding, the lenses will lighten.  You only have to keep track of one pair of glasses.  You don't have to carry regular glasses if you're going out to ride in bright sunlight and know you'll be out after dark.


Cons: They don't get quite as dark as the darkest shades you get get in a regular lens.  Slightly more expensive than regular lenses.  If you're in a car on a sunny day and your face is not in the sun, the lenses won't get as dark as your eyes might like.

M.A.R.K. said:

You can get prescription sunglasses wherever you go, the eye doctor, lens crafters, etc.. Tranition lenses are a newer thing where they are like regular glasses, but change when UV light hits them and darken. They are called photochromic lenses.

 

With any glasses really.. You can bring in frames, and have the doctor make lenses for them, if you do not like their selection.

 

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=photochromic+lenses

 

I have my prescriotion and buy all my glasses now from www.eyebuydirect.com

 

great prices; great selection and fast service.

 

DHB

 

disclaimer : I am in NO WAY affilliated with the site above; just a happy customer

and I do NOT play an optometrist online (or optician)

I can't believe no one has suggested contact lenses. I'd die if I had to wear glasses all the time. I'm near-sighted, so my situation is a little different, but my mom has bi-focal contact lenses that she says work great.

 

I use Acuvue 2 Advance lenses - you're supposed to wear them a week and then throw them out, but I use protein-removing solution at night, and wear them until they don't feel good anymore, generally 2-3 weeks. At ~$19 per box of 6 lenses, they're cheaper than a high-end pair of glasses per year, and I can wear regular sunglasses or goggles as I need them.

 

I do keep a couple cheap pairs of glasses from Zennioptical.com around for when I'm lounging - I've had good results from them, and the glasses are incredibly cheap. Spend the money getting a good eye doctor to write you the right prescription, then cheap out on the glasses.

I've worn glasses since Kindergarten.  Don't ask. I bike with my everyday glasses. I'm blind without my glasses so I always buy two pairs at the same time since inevitably something will break.

 

With regards to sunglasses, I used to buy prescription sunglasses.  The frames I currently wear offered clip-ons in a range of tints so I opted for clip-ons.  These aren't generic one-size-fits-all cheesy flip-ups but clip-on's cut to match the lense shape, complete with wire frame and claws. 

 

My wife recently started wearing reading glasses.  She's fortunate enough to get by with the reading glasses from Osco, 3 for $10.  They're offered in various strengths.

 

I have worn glasses for 30 years and have spent so much money on frames of all kinds. I got turned on to Zenni optical by a client and they are great. I bought three pairs one was a pair of sunglasses. All where great. Total coast for all of them $26.00 I would suggest them to any one just make sure you look at the measurements of the frames.

Link  http://www.zennioptical.com/

 

 

A warning about contacts:

 

I don't personally wear them, but I have friends that do that have told me that their eyes sometimes get dried out while riding even with eye protection so it might not be the ideal choice for all. 

 

Just something to consider.


sten said:

I can't believe no one has suggested contact lenses. I'd die if I had to wear glasses all the time. I'm near-sighted, so my situation is a little different, but my mom has bi-focal contact lenses that she says work great.

 

I use Acuvue 2 Advance lenses - you're supposed to wear them a week and then throw them out, but I use protein-removing solution at night, and wear them until they don't feel good anymore, generally 2-3 weeks. At ~$19 per box of 6 lenses, they're cheaper than a high-end pair of glasses per year, and I can wear regular sunglasses or goggles as I need them.

 

I do keep a couple cheap pairs of glasses from Zennioptical.com around for when I'm lounging - I've had good results from them, and the glasses are incredibly cheap. Spend the money getting a good eye doctor to write you the right prescription, then cheap out on the glasses.

As with the rest, I wear my normal glasses. I used to favor my 'backup' glasses when riding, as my regular pair were extremely expensive and I was vaguely afraid of something happening to them if I was in a crash. Now my 'backup' pair aren't the cheapest either and I don't worry so much. 

 

I think you'd appreciate an anti-glare coating on the lenses for riding at night. I certainly notice the difference. 

 

Also, I couldn't do without my prescription sunglasses, which I wear tons.

 

 

Thanks to all.

I think what I'm gonna do is . . .

well, let me think about it some more.

Prescription clear. Prescription sunglasses.

h' said:
So on sunny days you just don't wear prescription glasses?

Kevin C said:
Regular everyday prescription glasses. Clear for night and clouds. Sunglasses for sunny days.
I used to use a progresive lens on my cycling glasses, but they give you some distortion on the lower edges. This yr I purchased my bifocals set up as a small circle, standard distance vision everywhere else and this small dot that is my reading script. This works out great for riding, no more distortion when looking back at traffic while still being able to read street signs from a distance and my bike computer.  My ins pays for a small portion of them , I think out of pocket was over $300, but they are also transition lenses. I wear them for riding and as my primary glasses.

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